native herbaceous plants

Aconitum uncinatum
Monkshood  $10.99
Light: part sun - shade
Size: 2-4’
Blooms: mid-late summer
Color: royal blue - purple

Prefers to grow in a moist/wet, cool and lightly shaded area. 1” deep hooded flowers clustered at the end of arching stems. Up to 6 inch coarsely lobed leaves with 3-5 lobes. A lovely and vigorous plant well suited for the garden.







Acorus americanus

Sweet Flag  $9.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-4’
Bloom: midsummer
Color: greenish-yellow 2-4’ cylindrical spikes (spadix)
Culture and Notes: A hardy pond, bog or water garden plant with sweet, spicy-scented leaves. Thrives in permanently wet soils. Often found in the wild with blue flag iris and narrow-leaf cattail.




 


Actaea pachypoda

White Baneberry, Doll’s Eyes  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 2-3’
Bloom: flowers in May, fruits in August
Color: white flowers, white fruit
Culture and Notes: A double-whammy plant for dry to moist shade. Would love soil with a lot of organic matter, but isn’t picky, as long as it’s well drained. Basal leaves are divided and serrated. In late May, white flowers arranged in a fuzzy pillar are frequently pollinated by beetles, bees and syrphid flies. By August, the thick flowering stems have turned to wine-pink supporting large white berries with a black spot in the center. Hence, the common name of “doll’s eyes.” Berries are eaten by small mammals, but are highly poisonous to people.

Actaea racemosa
Black Cohosh  $12.99
Light: part sun to shade
Height: 2-4’ (up to 7’ when flowering)
Blooms: midsummer
Color: white
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is rich and well drained. Can live in more sun with plentiful water. It has a delicate airy effect on landscape. The smell is strong and unattractive to bugs. Endangered in Massachusetts.




Actaea rubra
Red Baneberry  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 2-3’
Bloom: flowers in May, fruits in August
Color: white flowers, bright red fruit
Culture and Notes: Virtually identical in appearance and culture to its relative Actaea pachypoda, except for the brilliant red fruit that ripens in July on slender stems. Ideal soil has lots of organic matter, but this plant isn’t picky. It just wants shade and good drainage. Berries are eaten by small mammals, but are poisonous to people.


Adlumia fungosa

Fumitory Vine  $14.99
Light: part shade - shade
Size: 10’
Blooms: mid - summer
Color: pink / white
A delicate woodland biennial vine that is often referred to as the Climbing Bleeding Heart. Pink or white tubular flowers appear on drooping panicles against bright green fern – like foliage which is finely divided. Prefers average, well drained soil.






Ageratina altissima

White Snakeroot  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 3-5’
Blooms: late summer
Color: white
Culture and Notes: In late summer, into the blank flowering space between cardinal flower and white wood aster, leaps the white snakeroot like a superhero! A resilient flower with slightly fuzzy, flat-topped clusters of milky white perched on stalwart stems. Thrives in soils with a little lime, but tolerates almost any soil conditions, other than wet.




Allium cernuum

Nodding Onion  $9.99

Native to New York.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 12-16”
Blooms: late June
Color: medium pink
Culture and Notes: Interplant with other native perennials because the allium will go dormant after flowering. Grows well in most garden soils and is drought tolerant. Mild onion-flavored bulbs are excellent fresh or cooked. Produces a beautiful nodding spray of pink flowers. Threatened in New York.





Allium tricoccum

Wild Leek/Ramps  $12.99

Native to New York.
Light: shade
Height: 6-8”
Blooms: late summer
Color: white
Culture and Notes: These members of the garlic family are now in danger of being exterminated due to collection by zealous chefs. We encourage you to raise your own and to use the tasty leaves, rather than the bulb, to preserve this beautiful woodland specimen. Glossy leaves disappear in summer, replaced by creamy white flowers. Prefers moist, rich soil in shade.


Amsonia tabernaemontana
Bluestar  $9.99

Native to New Jersey.
Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: spring
Color: blue
Culture and Notes: A large, highly adaptable species. This shade-tolerant plant likes moist woods, yet can handle drier soil once established. Forget-me-not-blue flowers attract Mourning Cloaks and other early spring butterflies.







Anemone canadensis

Canada Anemone  $9.99

Light: sun to shade
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: early summer
Color: white
Culture and Notes: Prefers moist to average soil. In sun, a vigorous grower once established. Great understory or groundcover. Endangered in Connecticut.






Anemone virginiana

Thimbleberry  $9.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 12-18”
Blooms: May-June
Color: greenish-white
Culture and Notes: Suitable for dry to moist open woods or half shade. Can tolerate full sun if soil is moist. Slender, upright habit with palm-shaped leaves. Inch-wide flowers are white suffused with pale green. A good plant for blending with sedges and broad leaved plants.





Angelica atropurpurea
Purple Angelica  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 4-6’
Blooms: summer
Color: white to pale green
Culture and Notes: Green foliage with deep red veins can be up to two feet across. Tall round flower umbels rise on purple stems and may reach 8-10” in diameter. This stout plant prefers a moist site in sandy to clay-like soils. An important host plant for various Swallowtail butterfly species. Flowers emit a strong honey scent. A short-lived perennial, dying after it sets seed. Prolong life by cutting back the flower stalk before it sets seed, or allow it to reseed and start a new crop.




Apocynum androsaemifolium
Dogbane $10.99












Aquilegia canadensis

Columbine  $10.99

Light: sun to shade
Height: 1-3’
Blooms: late spring-early summer
Color: red-yellow
Culture and Notes: Will tolerate many soils but must be well drained. Cut back flowers for second bloom. Lives in almost all light conditions. Attracts hummingbirds. Larval host for the Columbine Dusky Wing butterfly.



 


Aralia racemosa

Spikenard  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 2-5’
Blooms: summer
Color: white flowers, purple fruit
Culture and Notes: Tiny white flowers with purple-red showy berries in fall makes this a great addition to any garden! Has a branching habit and prefers moist, fertile soil along streams and borders of woods.


 


Arisaema dracontium
Green Dragon   $11.99
Light:part shade to shade
Height: 1-3’
Bloom: May
Color: green
Culture and notes: Each plant has one large leaf, which is subdivided into many smaller leaflets. The flowers are actually miniscule, but densely arranged along the long “tongue” of the dragon that emerges from its flaring hood. Berries are a vivid crimson and ripen in early fall. Happiest in moist soil with plenty of organic matter, it will spread to form a thriving colony. Nevertheless, it is surprisingly tolerant of average conditions in part shade. Threatened in Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire; of special concern/vulnerable in Connecticut and New York.
 

Arisaema triphyllum
Jack-in-the-Pulpit  $12.99

Light: part to full shade
Height: 18-30”
Blooms: late spring to early summer
Color: green and purple
Culture and Notes: Unique flower disappears to form a cluster of bright red berries. Ideal soil is moist or wet. Will re-seed happily under the right conditions.






 
Aruncus dioicus
Bride’s Feathers, Goatsbeard  $9.99

Native to eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
Light: part sun to shade
Height: 3-6’
Blooms: late spring, early summer
Color: creamy white
Culture and Notes: A great source of pollen and nectar, this plant trembles with bees, beetles and other pollinators. Plumes can grow up to 12”, making this a nice alternative to astilbe. Prefers dappled shade or morning sun and rich moisture-retentive soil.



Asarum canadense
Wild Ginger
  $10.99
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6-8”
Blooms: spring
Color: purple-brown
Culture and Notes: Attractive woodland groundcover. Companion plant with maiden hair fern, trilliums or foam flower. Ideal soil is moist and rich.





 

Asclepias incarnata
Purple Butterflyweed, Swamp Milkweed 
$10.99
Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: summer
Color: pink to lavender
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist, but will tolerate wet feet. Attracts swarms of butterflies; seed pods provide late fall interest in wildflower gardens. Asclepias is the host plant for Monarch Butterfly larvae.






Asclepias purpurascens
Purple Milkweed  --  Unavailable 2014
Light: Sun
Size: 3-4'
Blooms: July-August
Color: purple-pink
Flower heads droop with the weight of sweetly scented blossoms, supported by stalwart stems. Like the common and swamp milkweeds, it is a vital host for monarch caterpillars. The purple flowers themselves seem to blossom with nectar-hungry butterflies.






Asclepias tuberosa

Orange Butterflyweed  $12.99

Light: sun
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: July
Color: vivid orange to red-orange
Culture and Notes: Grows well in sandy, dry soils in full sun. Most of our sandplain habitat has been lost to development, making this an uncommon plant in the Berkshires. Delicious nectar attracts scores of butterflies, while the leaves are host to Monarch Butterflies. Endangered in New Hampshire, threatened in Vermont and vulnerable in New York.




Asclepias verticillata
Eastern Whorled Milkweed  $10.99












Asclepias viridis
Green Milkweed  -- Unavailable 2014
 











Baptisia australis

Blue False Indigo  $10.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 3-4’
Blooms: May-June
Color: violet blue
Culture and Notes: Proud spikes of pea-shaped flowers top decorative foliage. Grows well in slightly acidic to neutral soil. Native to moist woodlands and grasslands. Do not disturb once established.


 


Baptisia tinctoria
Yellow False Indigo  $10.99

Light: sun
Height: 2-3’
Bloom: June
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: This sun-lover helps to fix nitrogen in soils, making it more available for other plants. Once established it’s a resilient plant with lovely rounded leaves, thriving in tough conditions with little water. Sunny yellow, sweet-pea flowers are held above the foliage and eventually ripen into long black pods that provide ornamental interest. Several butterfly larvae may nibble on the leaves and it’s a host plant for Indigo Duskywings and Frosted Elfins. Lovely for naturalizing in meadows or massing in a cottage garden.


Boltonia asteroides
White Doll's Daisy  $10.99













Caltha palustris
Marsh Marigold  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 6-12”
Blooms: early spring
Color: golden yellow
Culture and Notes: A bright yellow harbinger of spring, the marsh marigold adds vibrant color to boggy areas. Prefers moist or wet soil; standing water is okay in spring. May go dormant after flowering.






Campanula rotundifolia
Harebell  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: June-September
Color: blue to purple
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is well drained and moist, but will tolerate drier soil. Delicate purple-blue flowers will bloom throughout the season. Vulnerable in New York.







Caulophyllum thalictroides
Blue Cohosh  $12.99













Chelone glabra
Turtlehead  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: July-August
Color: white
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist or wet and humusy, but will tolerate most regular garden soils with regular watering. Attracts butterflies. Grows in dense terminal spikes; blooms somewhat resemble the head of a turtle. This late bloomer is definitely worth the wait. Host for the Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly. Vulnerable in New York.




Claytonia caroliniana
Spring Beauty  $9.99
Light: part sun to shade
Size: 3-6"
Blooms: early spring
Color: whitish-pink to strong pink
Ideal soil is moist but well drained, slightly acidic or neutral. A spring ephemeral that will form dense carpets of candy-striped flowers. Corms are easy to transplant when dormant. Rare and endangered in Massachusetts.







Collinsonia canadensis
Citronella Horsebalm  $10.99













Conoclinium coelestinum
Blue Mistflower  $10.99












Coreopsis rosea
Pink Coreopsis  $9.99

Native to eastern Massachusetts, endangered in New York.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 1’
Blooms: July-August
Color: soft pink with yellow eyes
Culture and Notes: Forms dense stands of thin stems, covered with needle-like whorled leaves and half-inch pink daisy flowers; blooms for over four weeks. Early American settlers called coreopsis “tickseed” because of its ability to repel bedbugs, fleas and ticks. For this reason they often put coreopsis in their mattresses.



Coreopsis verticillata
Whorled Coreopsis  $9.99

Native to eastern and central Massachusetts
Height: 12-28”
Blooms: June
Color: golden yellow
Culture and Notes: Sunny wheels of gold adorn dense clumps of fine, feathery foliage. Tolerates almost any soil, except wet. Full sun is preferred, but can take a little afternoon shade.






Cornus canadensis
Bunchberry  $9.99
Light: part to full shade
Height: 3-9”
Blooms: late spring to early summer, flowers followed by berries
Color: white flowers, shiny red berries
Culture and Notes: Ideal conditions are moist, acidic soil with generous amounts of humus or rotten wood. Forms a carpet and is a fast grower once established. Sweet fragrance. Does best in North County. Plant next to logs to keep soil cool.






Delphinium exaltum
Tall Larkspur  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 3-4’
Bloom: July
Color: shades of purple
Culture and Notes: This lovely delphinium is wonderful to include in naturalized areas or as an accent garden plant. The flowers, borne on lovely, airy spikes, are smaller than the bloated ones of the exotic delphinium hybrids found in English gardens. Prefers moist, rich soil. Appreciates a little afternoon shade.


 

Desmodium canadense
Showy Tick Trefoil  $10.99

Light: part shade to sun
Height: 3-5’
Bloom: July
Color: rosy lavender pink
Culture and Notes: A vigorous, erect plant that is useful for grouping at the back of the border or naturalizing along a woodland edge. In midsummer, spires of pea-like flowers attract bees and the occasional hummingbird. While it supplies extra nitrogen to the soil by means of nodules on its roots, it also acts as gracious host for the caterpillars of Eastern Tailed Blue, Hoary Edge and Silver Spotted Skippers.


Dicentra cucullaria
Dutchman’s Breeches  $10.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 3-6” tall, 6-8” with flower
Blooms: early spring
Color: white to light pink
Culture and Notes: Native to moist, rich deciduous woodlands. Forms spreading colonies with noticeable crowns. The common name Dutchman’s breeches derives from their white flowers that look like white breeches. Seeds are spread by ants. Special value to bumblebees.





Dicentra eximia
Wild Bleeding Heart  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 12-18”
Blooms: mid-spring through summer
Color: light pink
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is rich, light and moist. Graceful fern-like foliage. Will keep blooming if flowers are cut back before forming seed pods.




 

Dodecatheon meadia
Eastern Shooting Star  $10.99

Native to southern Connecticut and southeastern New York.
Light: sun to light shade
Height: 8-14”
Blooms: spring
Color: pale pink to white
Culture and Notes: A charming spring ephemeral of the primrose family that relies on spring rains for its fast succulent growth. Similar in flower to a florist’s cyclamen, older many-crowned stems are an amazing sight. Can be planted in woodlands or rock gardens, wherever it will get sufficient spring moisture. Dormant by midsummer. Believed to be extinct in New York.
 

Echinacea purpurea
Purple Coneflower  $10.99

Native to southern Connecticut and southeastern New York.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: July-August
Color: dark rose petals with orange-brown center
Culture and Notes: A great butterfly magnet that is easy to grow in average garden soil and is drought tolerant. Coneflower is a summer garden staple. In Germany, purple coneflower is used to make over 140 different medicines.




Epigaea repens
Trailing Arbutus  $12.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 3-4”
Blooms: May
Color: white
Culture and Notes: Happiest when tucked into a shaded rock garden with slightly acid soil. This diminutive perennial forms low mats of leathery leaves with fragrant ½” flowers that blush with their own beauty. A woodland gem. Water for the first 2 to 3 years, after which it will tolerate drought.




Epilobium angustifolium
Fireweed  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-5’
Blooms: July
Color: bright pink/fuschia
Culture and Notes: Wonderful plant for meadows and woodland’s edge. Ideal soil is well drained. Provides a long-lived fiery flower display. In temperate climates, fireweed is one of the first species to colonize an area following vegetation disturbances. Once fireweed enters a disturbed community, it rapidly becomes abundant. Does best in north Berkshire County.




Eupatorium perfoliatum
Boneset  $9.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 3-5’
Blooms: late summer
Color: white
Culture and Notes: Flowers in white terminal umbels from July to September; light sweet-smelling blooms attract butterflies. Beautiful when combined with purple Joe-pye. Ideal soil is moist to wet. An excellent naturalizer around lakes and ponds.




 

Eutrochium purpureum
Purple Joe-Pye Weed  $9.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 4-8’
Blooms: August-September
Color: pink to purple
Culture and Notes: Perfect for wet meadows or pondside planting. Often found with boneset in the wild. Leaves have a sweet vanilla scent.




 

Eurybia divaricata
White Wood Aster  $9.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: fall
Color: white flowers with rose centers
Culture and Notes: Any soil will do; adds fall color for 4-8 weeks! Important source of late-season nectar for butterflies and bees.







Eurybia macrophylla
Big Leaf Aster  $9.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: August-October
Color: lavender to white
Culture and Notes: An excellent woodland’s edge groundcover forming dense carpets of heart-shaped leaves. Shoots of lavender flowers last for months and the more sun it gets (but not full sun), the more flowers appear. Prefers average to moist garden soils.





Filipendula rubra
Queen-of-the-Prairie  $14.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 3-5’
Blooms: July
Color: pink
Culture and Notes: A regal plant with rich pink cotton-candy-colored flowers that resemble astilbe. Tends to spread and may not be good in a manicured garden. Plant with tall grasses to hide foliage die-back after flowering.




Fragaria virginiana
Wild Strawberry  $9.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 3-6”
Blooms: flowers in spring, fruit in summer
Color: white flowers with red berries
Culture and Notes: Tolerates many soil conditions. An enthusiastic groundcover, with beautiful red fall color and tasty edible fruits.






Gentiana andrewsii
Andrew’s Bottle Gentian  $14.99

Light: part sun to sun
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: fall
Color: pale blue to deep violet
Culture and Notes: This late bloomer provides intense color into fall and is well worth the wait. Grows best in moist soil with part sun. Threatened in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont. Vulnerable in New York.





Geranium maculatum
Cranesbill, Wild Geranium  $9.99

Light: sun to shade
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: May-June
Color: lavender-pink
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist and well drained. Will tolerate many soil conditions. Great for naturalizing under trees with wild columbine and foam flower.






Geranium robertianum
Herb Robert  $9.99
Light: part shade to shade
Size: 6-8"
Blooms: late May through September
Color: pink to white
A carefree, cheerful little perennial that blooms all summer. Found naturally in rocky shade with shale or limestone, it will adapt to almost any well drained soil that isn't very acid. Self sows exuberantly and makes an outstanding filler plant for bare spots, shady rock gardens, etc.






Geum rivale
Purple Havens  $10.99
Light: sun
Size: 1-2’
Blooms: summer
Color: purple

Purple flowers nod from a 1’ high flowering stem. Flowers are ¾-1” across and consists of 5 dull red to dark purple petals. It prefers wet to moist soils and tolerates various kinds of soil.







Geum triflorum

Prairie Smoke  $12.99

Native to New York.
Light: sun
Height: 10-16”
Blooms: spring
Color: pink
Culture and Notes: Prairie smoke forms mats of small hairy rosettes that send up stiff stalks with a cluster of cupped blooms on each. Doubles as a semi-evergreen groundcover for full sun and rock gardens. Unique and attractive seed heads. Threatened in New York.



Helenium autumnale
Dog-tooth Daisy  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 4-5’
Blooms: August-September
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Yellow daisy-like flowers brighten any garden and make great cut flowers. Moist to wet soil. Tolerates flooding.








Helianthus decapetalus
Thinleaf Sunflower  $10.99













Helianthus divaricatus
Woodland Sunflower  $9.99

Light: part shade
Height: 3-5’
Blooms: August-October
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is sandy and well drained, but will tolerate a variety of soil conditions. Blooms can last several weeks.






Heliopsis helianthoides
Ox-eye Sunflower  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 4-6’
Blooms: July-September
Color: golden orange
Culture and Notes: Does well in moist or dry conditions. Attracts butterflies in summer and rich sunflower seeds attract birds in fall. Incredibly long-lasting blooms look great in a border perennial garden.







Hepatica acutiloba
Sharp-lobed Hepatica  $10.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 3-6” (8-12” with flowers)
Blooms: spring
Color: pale to dark violet-blue or white
Culture and Notes: Typically found on rich or rocky wooded slopes, and on mossy banks and ledges. It is a stemless plant that features large basal leaves with three rounded lobes and light blue to lavender (occasionally white) anemone-like flowers (1/2 to 1” diameter) which appear singly atop hairy, naked stalks.




Hepatica americana
Round-lobed Hepatica  $10.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 4-8” (8-12” with flower)
Blooms: spring
Color: dark violet-blue
Culture and Notes: Grows in rich woodlands. Each flower comes up from the ground on its own stem, which is covered by long, fine hairs. Older plants form clumps with 20 to 30 or more flowers. Flowers open fullest on sunny days and the display lasts for several weeks. New leaves emerge, neatly furled, first shiny and bright fresh green, then darkening as they mature. The leaves are heart shaped at the base.



Heuchera americana
Alumroot  $10.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 1-3’
Blooms: early summer
Color: cream
Culture and Notes: American alumroot is a fantastic foliage plant-–its ruffled leaves are streaked with silver and red-purple highlights for year-round interest. Plant with woodland phlox for a nice display. Grows naturally on rock outcrops and well-drained, rich wooded slopes. Very adaptable for garden use. Use it along a path for edging, in the rock garden, or for color accent.



Hibiscus moscheutos
Rose Mallow  $12.99

Native to central/eastern Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York.
Light: sun
Height: 3-6’
Blooms: August
Color: white to pink with a dark center
Culture and Notes: Graceful 3-to-4-inch-wide flowers look more like Hawaii than the Berkshires, and add tons of bright color to the garden. The foliage is slow to emerge in the spring (often not until late May). Plant with tall grasses to hide foliage die-back after flowering. Works well by ponds and rain gardens. Tolerates brief flooding.



Houstonia caerula
Bluets  $10.99












Hydrastis canadensis
Goldenseal  $12.99
Light: part to full shade
Size: 8-12"
Blooms: spring
Color: white flowers with shiny red berries
Ideal soil is slightly acidic, rich and evenly moist. Will tolerate most garden soils with a little special attention. Fertilize moderately and water during prolonged dry spells. Mulching with deciduous hardwood leaves will help mimic native habitat and retain moisture. Rare and endangered in Massachusetts.





Ionactis linariifolius

Stiff Aster  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 1’
Blooms: August
Color: violet
Culture and Notes: Well suited to dry rock garden conditions. Shiny needle-like leaves are like no other aster.









Iris cristata
Dwarf Crested Iris  $9.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 4-8”
Blooms: spring
Color: violet, occasionally white
Culture and Notes: This adaptable plant does best in fertile soil with a few hours of direct sun. It blooms little flowers with a light colored crest on each petal. Smaller and more shade tolerant than its larger cousin, the blue flag iris, it makes a great groundcover in shady, woodland areas.




Iris versicolor
Blue Flag Iris  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Size: 18” - 4’
Blooms: late spring
Color: blue-violet
Culture and Notes: Tropical-sized foliage and blue-violet flowers make this a stunning native iris. Ideal soil is moist or wet; likes standing water. Will thrive in regular garden soil with moderate moisture. Occasionally visited by hummingbirds.


Jeffersonia diphylla
Twinleaf  $9.99

Native to New York.
Light: shade
Height: 12-16”
Blooms: early spring
Color: white
Culture and Notes: This plant prefers a bright spot in the spring yet out of the sun of summer. Its pretty eight-petaled flowers form an amazing large urn-shaped capsule full of cinnamon-toned seeds. A sweet addition to any woodland garden. Twinleaf is threatened in New York and endangered in New Jersey.


Liatris spicata
Blazing Star  $10.99

Native to New Jersey.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: summer
Color: pink-purple
Culture and Notes: Preferring full sun and tolerating a variety of soil conditions, liatris’ fine foliage and spikes of purple flowers perform a great midsummer show. A great cut flower known for its high nectar content and butterfly-attracting powers. An excellent choice for a garden or naturalized meadow.



Lilium canadense
Canada lily  $14.99
Light: sun to light shade
Size: 3-5'
Blooms: July
Color: yellow-orange
This wild lily prefers moist or wet, acidic soil, but will grow well in average garden soil. The trumpet-shaped nodding bell flowers cluster in groups of seven to ten per stem. Provides beautiful cut flowers.













Lilium michiganese
Michigan Lily  $14.99












Lilium philadelphicum
Wood Lily  $19.99












Lilium superbum
Turk's Cap Lily  $14.99
Light: part shade to sun
Size: 5-7' tall
Blooms: July
Color: yellow/orange/red
This show-stopping native lily offers stunning color and architectural form. Prefers moist to wet soil. Enjoys part shade, but can grow in sun if the soil is consistently moist.







Linnaea borealis
Twinflower  $10.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 1-5”
Blooms: spring
Color: white tinged with pink
Culture and Notes: A beautiful groundcover that grows great on mossy logs. Twinflower thrives in moist, rich, acidic soil. Of special concern in Connecticut.







Lobelia cardinalis
Cardinal Flower  $10.99

Light: sun to shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: late summer
Color: flame red
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist or wet with lots of organic matter. Will tolerate drier soil, but water well during bloom period. Favorite of hummingbirds. Does not like to be overcrowded and can easily be overcome by more aggressive growers. Vulnerable in New York.




Lobelia siphilitica
Great Blue Lobelia  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: summer
Color: blue
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist or wet, rich and slightly alkaline. Will tolerate a variety of soil conditions. A rare true blue color. Attracts hummingbirds, butterflies and bees. Endangered in Massachusetts. Vulnerable in New York.






Ludwigia alternifolia
Seedbox  $10.99












Lupinus perennis
Sundial Lupine  $10.99

Light: sun
Height: 12-30”
Blooms: early summer
Color: blue-violet blooms
Culture and Notes: Prefers gritty, well-drained, slightly acidic soil. This nitrogen-fixing legume is also a butterfly magnet. Doesn’t like disturbance so plant where it can naturalize freely. Companion plant with little bluestem, butterflyweed, penstemon and asters. Endangered in Vermont. Threatened in New Hampshire.





Maianthemum stellatum
Star-Flowered False Solomon Seal  $9.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: May
Color: White
Culture and Notes: Star-shaped flowers release a deliciously sweet perfume. Can be used as a groundcover in woodlands or shade gardens.





Marshallia grandiflora
Barbara’s Buttons  $10.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 10-14”
Blooms: early summer
Color: rose pink to lavender
Culture and Notes: Glossy narrow leaves that send up dozens of single flowered stems reminiscent of an intricate lace doily. Prefers moist to wet soils. Does fine in drier gardens with rich soil. Endangered in Pennsylvania.





Meehania cordata
Creeping Mint  $9.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: part sun to shade
Height: 4-10”
Blooms: spring
Color: violet to white
Culture and Notes: A low creeping woodland groundcover that prefers damp shady spots with filtered morning sun and fertile soil. A perfect native alternative to ajuga or lamium.





Mertensia virginica
Virginia Bluebells  $10.99

Native to eastern/central Massachusetts and New York.
Light: part sun to shade
Height: 14-20”
Blooms: spring
Color: pink changing to light blue
Culture and Notes: An easy species, the largest and most robust bluebell and the one most suffering from wild collection. Prefers moist, well-drained soil, with spring sun and summer shade. Dormant in summer. Vulnerable in New York.





Mimulus ringens
Monkey Flower  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: June-September
Color: lavender
Culture and Notes: Prefers wet areas such as swamps, streamsides and lakesides, but will grow in dry dusty areas as well. Tolerates most any conditions.





Mitchella repens
Partridgeberry  $9.99
Light: part shade to shade
Size: 1-2"
Blooms: spring to summer, berries all year
Color: white flowers, red berries
Grows in moist to dry soil and makes an excellent groundcover that remains green all winter. Can get smothered under leaves but loves a side dressing of pine needles.







Mitella diphylla

Bishop’s Cap, Mitrewort  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6-8”
Bloom: May
Color: white
Culture and Notes: A delicately textured, but sturdy, groundcover for shade. Happiest in moist soils with organic matter, where it will enthusiastically spread both by its numerous tiny brown seeds and by creeping stems. Each tiny flower is a perfect snowflake in form. Combines well with the lavender-blue woodland phlox, as well as a host of other woodland beauties.



Monarda didyma
Scarlet Bee Balm, Oswego Tea  $10.99

Native to central Massachusetts and New York.
Light: sun to light shade
Height: 3-4’
Blooms: June-August
Color: scarlet to crimson red
Culture and Notes: Happy in moist, fertile soil. Boasts enormous red flowers that bloom for 4-6 weeks. To avoid self-sowing, cut back after flowering. A true hummingbird magnet.




Monarda fistulosa
Wild Bee Balm  $10.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: summer
Color: lavender to pink
Culture and Notes: Provides a stunning summer floral display with a pleasant fragrance. Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. Ideal soil is moist but will thrive in dry soil.






Monarda punctata
Horsemint  $10.99

Native to central/eastern Massachusetts and New York.
Light: full sun
Height: 1-3’
Bloom: June
Color: pink/yellow/white
Culture and Notes: These perky little mopheads are as colorful as a basket of pastel Easter eggs. Tubular yellow flowers with tiny purplish spots are supported by pale pink and yellow bracts. Visited by hummingbirds. The leaves are fragrant, rather like oregano. It thrives best in soils that are very well drained and not too acid. A short-lived perennial, but will self-sow where happy.

Pachysandra procumbens
Allegheny Spurge  $10.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6-12”
Blooms: May/June
Color: white
Culture and Notes: An elegant, clumping groundcover without the invasive properties of its common Asian cousin. Fragrant spikes of cobweb white flowers peep shyly above almost evergreen leaves. Tolerates drought and clay.

Packera aurea (Senecio aureus)
Golden Groundsel  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 24-30”
Blooms: May
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Native to wet, sunny meadows, this plant easily adapts to partly shaded conditions with dry to average soil. A cluster of basal leaves erupts in a burst of tall golden daisies. Can form a dense groundcover; seeds prolifically.





Parthenium integrifolium
Wild Quinine  $10.99













Penstemon calycosus
Calico Beardtogue  $10.99












Penstemon digitalis
Foxglove Beardtongue  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: June
Color: white
Culture and Notes: A beautiful, resilient, but underused perennial. Outstanding for dry meadows and gardens. Spires of tubular white flowers in June glow in the evening, attracting some moth pollinators. Basal leaves turn russet and remain through the winter. Seed stalks are a burnished copper, providing strong textural contrast with grasses. Tough and easy to grow.




Penstemon hirsutus
Hairy Beardtongue  $10.99
Light: sun – part sun
Size: 12-18”
Blooms: early Summer
Color: lavender - purple

A rather carefree perennial with 1” tubular flowers along a 16-24” tall stem. It prefers moist to dry, well drained soil. It does attract hummingbirds, benefits bees, and a larval host for the Baltimore Checkerspot – Euphydryas phaeton.







Phlox divaricata
Woodland Phlox  $9.99

Native to central and western New York and northern Vermont.
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6-12”
Blooms: May
Color: lavender blue
Culture and Notes: Happiest in dappled shade, this ethereally lovely plant grows in almost any soil. When combined with Mitella or Tiarella, it seems as if the summer sky has descended to the forest floor. Will moderately self-seed.

Phlox maculata
Meadow Phlox  $10.99













Phlox paniculata
Autumn Phlox  $9.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: sun to part shade
Height: 30-40”
Blooms: August
Color: deep pink
Culture and Notes: Tolerant of a wide range, but happiest in moist, organic soils. Lush heads of deep pink flowers attract industrious bees and hummingbirds. An attractive textural combination with taller grasses and sedges.



Phlox pilosa
Fragrant Phlox, Downy Phlox   $9.99

Native to Connecticut.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 1-2’
Blooms: late spring
Color: shades of pink to lavender
Culture and Notes: Clusters of fragrant, tubular flowers in shades of pink and lavender atop downy stems that bow under their weight. This phlox is delicate, yet tough. Will grow in average soil with good drainage.




Phlox stolonifera
Creeping Phlox  $9.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6-10”
Blooms: May-June
Color: pink to violet blue
Culture and Notes: A beautiful semi-evergreen woodland groundcover which prefers moist, slightly acidic soil. Great for naturalizing in a native lawn.



Phlox subulata
Moss Phlox  $9.99

Native to central Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York.
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-6”
Blooms: May-June
Color: pink
Culture and Notes: Make your lawn more interesting with spreading mats of evergreen leaves that will literally blaze with color in the spring. Prefers dry, sandy soil in full sun. Wait two weeks after flower and then mow your lawn as usual.  Also a great border plant in rock gardens.




Physostegia virginiana

Obedient Plant  $9.99

Native to New York.
Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: August
Color: pink
Culture and Notes: Will tolerate most soil conditions with regular moisture. Resembles snapdragon flowers, excellent for cutting. Not so obedient, will happily take up as much room as you give it. Try companion planting with wild bee balm and black-eyed Susan. Threatened in Vermont.





Podophyllum peltatum

Mayapple  $12.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 8-16”
Blooms: late spring
Color: pearly white
Culture and Notes: Mayapple is an excellent bold and carefree groundcover, spreading with stiff, forking rhizomes. The paired leaves protect a pale white flower that huddles beneath, protected from the harsher elements and sun. Once established can grow in almost any soil condition.


Polemonium reptans
Jacob’s Ladder  $10.99

Native to western New York.
Light: part sun to light shade
Height: 10-16”
Blooms: spring
Color: light blue
Culture and Notes: This uncommon plant native to New York produces ladder-rung-like leaves that help form many branched flower stems that hold the blooms in loose sprays over the foliage. A great butterfly attractor, prefers moist, wooded areas.


Polygonatum commutatum
Solomon’s Seal  $10.99

Light: shade to part shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: spring
Color: white with blue-black berries
Culture and Notes: Elegantly arching stems bear glossy leaves and green-tipped bells, which ripen into blue-black fruit in late summer. Although commonly a woodland plant, it will also grow in full sun if kept consistently moist. Unique foliage plant for shade gardens. Companion plant with ferns, black cohosh or wild ginger. Endangered in New Hampshire.



Porteranthus trifoliatus
Bowman's Root  $10.99
Light: sun to light shade
Size: 2–3’
Blooms: May, June
Color: white with a pink tinge

Starry shaped and airy – 1” flowers float above the foliage on this shrubby perennial. Flowers have 5 narrow petals and are borne in loose panicles. In the fall this plant gives beautiful foliage, offering wonderful shades of oranges and yellows.





Pycnanthemum muticum
Mountain Mint  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: mid to late summer
Color: lavender to white
Culture and Notes: Deep green foliage with silvery bracts make for a unique bloom display, especially beautiful with bee balm. The wonderful fragrance of mint and oregano attracts many pollinators. Spreads happily in moist to average soil. Be sure to water during prolonged periods of drought. Threatened in New York.

Rhexia virginica
Meadow Beauty  $10.99











Rudbeckia fulgida
Orange Coneflower  $10.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: sun to part shade
Height: 24-36”
Blooms: June-July
Color:gold
Culture and Notes: Long blooming, carefree and a cheerful staple of the sunny garden. Prolific golden daisies with chocolate brown centers are visited by butterflies, while its seeds are relished by chipmunks, birds and others. Prefers moist organic soil in sun, but will tolerate clay, drought or part shade.



Rudbeckia hirta
Black-eyed Susan  $9.99

Light: sun
Height: 1-3’
Blooms: June-September
Color: yellow-orange
Culture and Notes: Not picky about soil conditions; will grow in almost any site. Great cut flower, a butterfly magnet. A short-lived perennial, but with the quantity of seed it sets, you will never be out of black-eyed Susans.






Rudbeckia laciniata
Green-eyed Coneflower  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 3-7’
Blooms: July-August
Color: yellow, green cones (or “eyes”)
Culture and Notes: Not picky about soil conditions; will grow in almost any site. A great cut flower with unique foliage, and a butterfly and goldfinch magnet.





Rudbeckia triloba
Brown-eyed Susan  $10.99












Ruellia humilis
Fringeleaf Wild Petunia  $10.99

Native to Pennsylvania.
Light: part shade to sun
Height: 12-24”
Blooms: July-August
Color: lavender
Culture and Notes: Thrives in part shade and poor, well-drained soil, but is adaptable to a wide range of conditions. The flowers are miniature petunias in the softest of lavender. Long blooming and, although not assertive, it makes a lovely little groundcover.




Sanguinaria canadensis

Bloodroot  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 8-12”
Blooms: early May
Color: gleaming white
Culture and Notes: In early spring, the soft gray-green, lobed leaves of bloodroot wrap round the budding flowers like a Victorian cloak. Flower opens during the day and closes at night. Named for the thickened rhizome that “bleeds” red if scratched, bloodroot extracts have been used in both face paint and toothpaste.



Sanguisorba canadensis
Canadian Burnet  $12.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 4-5’
Blooms: late summer into fall
Color: creamy white
Culture and Notes: Prefers moist or wet soil. Beautiful blue-green compound leaves fold in when plant is shaken or disturbed. Late in the season produces lovely bottle-brush flowers that pollinators love.





Scutellaria incana
Downy Skullcap  $10.99

Native to New York.
Light: sun to light shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: mid to late summer
Color: violet blue
Culture and Notes: One of the showiest of the skullcaps with a clumping habit. The tubular violet flowers have a flared lower lip and a hooded protruding upper lip. Great for borders, meadows or woodlands. Endangered in New York.






Scutellaria lateriflora
Mad-Dog Skullcap  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 2-3’
Bloom: July or August
Color: violet to lavender
Culture and Notes: Excellent as a naturalizing filler for damp thickets, seepy meadows, rain gardens, creek and pond sides, and wet woodland edges. Small tubular flowers of blue-violet and scalloped, textured leaves. Self-sows where happy.




Sedum ternatum
Wild Stonecrop  $9.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6”
Blooms: May-June
Color: white
Culture and Notes: Flowers are waxy white stars containing stamens tipped with ebony, like a grain of pepper. Loves shaded, rocky banks or as a groundcover under shrubs. Found in moist, well-drained, shady areas.





Senna hebecarpa

Wild Senna  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 3-7’
Blooms: summer
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Large golden flowers spring up every year like towering exclamations to the power of life! Wild senna is extremely valuable fora dramatic vertical effect for a larger garden. Likes moist soil, anywhere from bottomlands and meadows to roadsides. Very adaptable. Endangered in Massachusetts and New Hampshire; threatened in Vermont; special concern in Connecticut.



Sibbaldiopsis tridentata
Three-tooth Cinquefoil  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4”
Blooms: July
Color: white
Culture and Notes: A wonderful choice for a difficult spot in your garden. It forms a running groundcover in dry, poor soils. Leaves are dark, glossy green in summer and turn blood red in fall. Endangered in Connecticut.





Silene caroliniana
Wild Pink  $9.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 4-8”
Blooms: late spring
Color: light to dark pink
Culture and Notes: A long-blooming plant with a low mound of dark leaves. Great in rock gardens, borders or meadows with smaller plants; drought tolerant. Companion plant with blue-eyed grass and stiff aster. Vulnerable in New York.





Silene virginica
Fire Pink  $9.99

Native to New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
Light: part shade
Height: 12-18”
Blooms: June-July
Color: red
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is well drained. Great border or rock garden plant. Does well at wood’s edge. Not long-lived, but re-seeds regularly when pollinated by hummingbirds and bees.





Silphium perfoliatum
Cup Plant  $10.99












Sisyrinchium angustifolium
Blue-eyed Grass  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 10-20”
Blooms: June-September with regular dead-heading
Color: a rare true blue flower with gold centers
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist and rich, but does well in most soils. Bloom period extended by deadheading. Great for borders and rock gardens.



Solidago caesia
Wreath Goldenrod  $9.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 1-3’
Blooms: fall
Color: golden yellow
Culture and Notes: Arching flowers are gorgeous at the woodland’s edge or in shade gardens. Any soil will do; not aggressive.








Solidago flexuosa
Zig Zag Goldenrod  $9.99
Light: dappled shade
Size: 12-18"
Blooms: October
Color: yellow/
A short, clumping goldenrod for moist shade. Broad serrated leaves cradle gold buttons in fall. Tolerates many soils, but luxuriates with lots of organic matter. All goldenrods are essential nectar plants for late season pollinators. Many moths dine on the leaves or flowers. In turn, these insects are consumed by several woodland songbirds.





Solidago speciosa

Showy Goldenrod  $9.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 1-3’
Blooms: August-September
Color: golden yellow
Culture and Notes: Wands of blazing yellow on deep red stems add color in late summer. Does well in a variety of garden soils as long as it’s well-drained.  Plant with New York aster, New England aster, New York ironweed and ox-eye sunflower for deep-hued informal fall color. Not aggressive. Essential source of late-season nectar.





Spiranthes cernua

Nodding Lady’s Tresses  $12.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 12-18”
Blooms: late fall
Color: crystalline white with evergreen rosettes
Culture and Notes: This small adaptable orchid is great for damp areas and can slowly spread to form colonies. Its lovely vanilla-scented blooms attract the last of the hungry pollinators in late fall. Spires of tiny spiraling flowers make this a unique beauty. Will do well in a consistently moist soil with plenty of organic matter. Vulnerable in New York.





Stylophorum diphyllum

Celandine Poppy  $9.99

Native to western Pennsylvania.
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 12-18”
Blooms: May
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Not to be confused with the rather invasive celandine. Golden goblets are held aloft just above clumps of shallowly lobed leaves. Fruit ripens into an oblong, fuzzy capsule, while stems form substantial clumps. Self seeds happily in moist, organic soil. Will go dormant in late summer.



Symphyotrichum cordifolium
Blue Wood Aster  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: early fall
Color: light blue/violet
Culture and Notes: Prefers average to dry soil, good at naturalizing at woodland edges. Provides great fall color when covered with half-inch-wide flowers. A good source of late-season nectar for butterflies and bees.





Symphyotrichum novae-angliae
New England Aster  $10.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: August-September
Color: dark purple
Culture and Notes: Late season blooms are an integral part of the ecology of our overwintering pollinators. Large bright blossoms stand out, attracting numerous butterflies. Ideal soil is moist but will tolerate almost any conditions. A great choice for a rain garden. Brilliant fall display when planted with showy goldenrod, New York aster, purple-stemmed aster.



Symphyotrichum novi-belgii
New York Aster  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: August-September
Color: light blue
Culture and Notes: Brightens forest edges and meadows in late summer; light blue flowers mix with the yellows of autumn nicely. Moist to average soil.






Symphyotrichum puniceum
Purple-stemmed Aster  $9.99

Light: sun to part shade
Height: 2-6’
Blooms: September-October
Color: sky blue to lavender
Culture and Notes: Dark purple stems offer great fall color. In the right conditions this aster will be covered in flowers. Attracts butterflies and birds. Ideal soil is moist or wet (likes wet feet).






Symphiotrichum sagittifolium
Arrow-leaved Aster  $9.99












Thalictrum dioicum
Meadow Rue  $9.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 2-3’
Blooms: spring
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Meadow rue is one of the first spring bloomers. Ideal soil is moist and rich. Great for woodland’s edge and shady gardens. Good cut flower. Female and male flowers on separate plants.



Thalictrum thalictroides
Rue Anemone  $9.99

Light: part sun to shade
Height: 4-8”
Blooms: spring to early summer
Color: white to rose pink
Culture and Notes: Prefers moist to average, well-drained, slightly acidic to neutral soil. Has fern-like foliage with delicate flowers; goes dormant midsummer. Charm like no other. Keep moist for a longer bloom period. Companion plant with creeping phlox. Threatened in New Hampshire.




Thermopsis villosa
Carolina Thermopsis  $10.99

Native to central/eastern Massachusetts.
Light: sun
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: June
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: A striking, sunny yellow lupine with bright green palm-shaped leaves. Smiles in well-drained soil, but sulks if it’s too wet.





Tiarella cordifolia
Foam Flower  $10.99

Light: part shade or shade
Height: 8-12”
Blooms: May
Color: white or light pink
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is moist and rich, but tolerates drier soil. Good groundcover. A great naturalizer for under trees, foliage is green throughout the season. Plant with Virginia bluebells or wild bleeding heart for added color and texture.





Tradescantia ohiensis
Bluejacket Spiderwort  $9.99
Light: sun to part shade
Size: 24-40"
Blooms: June
Color: shades of violet blue
Three-petaled blooms in shades of violet blue, with an occasional rosy surprise. Long, blue-green leaves suggest cool relief on a hot summer day. Average to dry soil. Loves afternoon shade.







Trillium erectum

Purple Trillium  $10.99
Light: light shade
Size: 6-20"
Blooms: May
Color: maroon
A beautiful woodland plant with deep maroon flowers surrounded by three leaves. Purple Trillium will form a thick woodland carpet after establishing itself in moist, acidic soil.







Trillium grandiflorum

White Trillium  $10.99
Light: light shade to shade
Size: 8-20"
Blooms: spring
Color: white fading to pink
Prefers moist, slightly acidic soil. In time, forms a beautiful woodland carpet. Seven years from seed to flower.








Trillium sessile
Toadshade  $10.99
Light: part shade to shade
Height: 6-8"
Bloom: May
Color: maroon
Fanned by broad leaves mottled with ivory, the buds of this trillium never open. The blood-red color of the flower and its distinctive odor indicate its common pollinators -- flies and beetles. Seeds, like those of all trilliums, are dispersed by energetic ants. A mysterious, understated gem for the woodland garden where soil is moist and organic. Endangered in New York.





Trillium undulatum
Painted Trillium  $12.99
Light: shade
Height: 10-14"
Blooms: May
Color: white with red-purple center
This ethereal denizen of cool, evergreen woodlands will grace any shaded, well-drained area with acid soil. Mulch lightly with evergreen needles. Tri-parted leaves support a 6-petaled white flower marked with a purple-red center. A single oval, deep-red fruit in late summer.






Uvularia grandiflora
Merrybells  $10.99

Light: part shade to shade
Height: 12-18”
Bloom: May
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Merrybells love organic soil that leans toward neutral, rather than acid. Perfect for much of our Berkshire limestone region. Although it loves moisture, once established it is very drought tolerant and will form a stout clump. Each petal is delicately twisted. Seeds are carried in inflated, star-shaped capsules. Blends beautifully with ferns, trilliums, twinleaf, and many other woodland dwellers. Endangered in Connecticut and New Hampshire.




Uvularia sessilifolia
Wild Oats  $10.99
Light: part shade to shade
Size: 8-14"
Blooms: May
Color: soft yellow
An essential component of the woodland garden, the cool green foliage provides welcome textural contrast for grasses, sedges, ferns and other wildflowers. Soft butter-yellow bells peal joyfully in mid-May. In moist, organic soil, it will form a sturdy clump. In drier conditions, it will wander at its own sweet will, threading its way through other plants.





Verbena hastata
Blue Vervain  $9.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 2-4’
Blooms: July-September
Color: rosy violet
Culture and Notes: This bristly perennial loves damp places. Ideal soil is moist or wet and well drained, but does fine in drier soil. Continues to bloom in drought and high heat. Small, deep-blue to purple flowers form on dense three-to-six-inch spikes. Makes a great cut flower.




Vernonia noveboracensis
New York Ironweed  $11.99

Light: sun to part sun
Height: 4-8’
Blooms: late summer
Color: deep reddish-purple
Culture and Notes: Stunning purple flowers make this plant too beautiful to resist! Prefers moist to average soil. A robust grower; be sure to give it some space.






Veronica officinalis
Creeping Speedwell  $9.99












Veronicastrum virginicum
Culver’s Root  $10.99
Light: sun to part sun
Height: 3-6’
Blooms: July-August
Color: white to lavender
Culture and Notes: Ideal soil is well drained and moist. Will tolerate any soil conditions except extremely alkaline soil. Dramatic flower spikes make great cut flowers. Attracts butterflies. Endangered in Vermont. Threatened in Massachusetts and New York.




Viola pedata
Bird-foot Violet  $10.99

Native to central/eastern Massachusetts.
Light:full sun to part shade
Height: 3-4”
Bloom: late April–early May
Color: deep lavender with yellow
Culture and Notes: Everyone recognizes this charming little violet, with its large lavender to purple flowers and finely dissected leaves, that thrives in sizzling sun and gritty, baking soil. An excellent rock garden plant or to tuck into those dry edges near sidewalks and steps. Excellent drainage is essential. Although they won’t spread vegetatively (unlike many other violets), they will reseed where happy. Host to the Regal Fritallary Butterfly. Vulnerable in New York.

Waldsteinia fragarioides
Barren Strawberry  $10.99

Light:part shade to shade
Height: 3-4”
Bloom: May
Color: yellow
Culture and Notes: Charming five-petaled yellow flowers and glossy three-lobed leaves would be enough to make this plant appealing. However, its affinity for growing in dry shade makes it an outstanding, albeit underused, selection. It relishes thin, rocky soil and little moisture, once established. A species of special concern in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Threatened in New Hampshire.



Zizia aurea
Golden Alexander  $10.99

Light: sun to shade
Height: 1-3’
Blooms: May
Color: golden yellow
Culture and Notes: This plant gives so much and asks so little. In the wild, it’s most often found in damp, open woods, or woodland banks where soil is moist. However, it will adapt to almost anywhere, from dry sun to wet shade. Tolerates clay well. Not only does it light up the landscape with its umbels of golden flowers, it’s a host plant for the Black Swallowtail butterfly. You may find these ethereally lovely green, yellow and black striped caterpillars on the leaves. When blooming time is over, you may either cut back the stalks or let them go to seed. Either way, by midsummer, you’ll have a low groundcover of serrated leaves.

This list of plants is provided to help you plan. Plants must be purchased at the nursery.